Go to City:
Login
Share On: Share on Facebook Share on Twitter  Share on LinkedIn  MySpace  Delicious
BARZZ Store  
Beer Garden
Toasts & Quotes
Scotch Heaven
Cigar Club
Bar Professionals
Vendors
Name
City
State
Zip
BarType
Advanced Bar Search
Map It
Wine-Food Pairing
 
arrow Main arrow History arrow Before You Taste arrow Tasting arrow Wine Making
arrow Grapes arrow Food Pairing arrow Events arrow Column arrow Glossary
 
     
 
Food and wine pairing is a complex process that combines a fundamental understanding of flavor, body, and intensity with subjective judgment based on personal preference. The old, general rule that combining red wine with red meat and white wine with fish and poultry fails to take into consideration many of the complexities found in today’s wines and foods. By itself, wine produces a different taste than when it is combined with food. Thus, it is important that one complement the other. The main goal is to strike a balance between the two where one does not overpower the other.
There are a couple basic enhancements that can be achieved through a proper combination of food and wine. In some cases, the acidity, sweetness, or general flavor of wine can be amplified or diminished when consumed with certain foods. For example, adding salt to a particular dish will diminish bitterness and make sweet wines taste sweeter. In other cases, new flavors can be perceived when the embedded flavors in the wine and food are combined. For example, the contrast of pairing a spicy dish with a sweet dessert wine can create new flavors and cleanse the palate. However, just as such combinations can provide a delicate interplay between wine and food, so to can the flavors of each diminish when not complemented well. For example, a strong wine can overpower a light dish creating an unpleasant balance between the two.
While personal experimentation is key to arriving at some of the more pleasurable dining experiences, following several general guidelines can help determine which combinations work best. First, when serving more than one wine at a meal, it is customary to serve lighter wines before full-bodied ones and dry before sweet wines, unless first serving a sweet dish which would be better suited with a sweet wine. Light to dark is a typical serving strategy for both wine and food, beginning with delicate tastes and working toward heavier ones. Also, lighter wines are better served with lighter dishes, while full-bodied wines are best paired with richer, heartier foods. This helps reduce the potential for a food or wine to overpower the other. In addition to the type of food served, it helps to also consider the method in which it is being prepared. Delicate wines are paired better with foods that are prepared in a more delicate manner, such as poached or steamed. Meals that are roasted, grilled, and sautéed should be paired with wine that matches the dominant seasoning and flavor of the food with careful consideration to the type of sauce used as well. Wine is always a great complement to cheese, but be careful in your pairing selections. Generally, the most intensely flavored and pungent cheeses are paired best with sweeter wine. White wines match best with soft cheeses and stronger flavors. Red wines are generally best paired with hard, milder cheeses. When offering several cheese choices, white wines will fair better than reds because the softer, creamier cheeses will interfere more with reds and diminish the wine to a bland taste.
While personal experimentation is key to arriving at some of the more pleasurable dining experiences, following several general guidelines can help determine which combinations work best. First, when serving more than one wine at a meal, it is customary to serve lighter wines before full-bodied ones and dry before sweet wines, unless first serving a sweet dish which would be better suited with a sweet wine. Light to dark is a typical serving strategy for both wine and food, beginning with delicate tastes and working toward heavier ones. Also, lighter wines are better served with lighter dishes, while full-bodied wines are best paired with richer, heartier foods. This helps reduce the potential for a food or wine to overpower the other. In addition to the type of food served, it helps to also consider the method in which it is being prepared. Delicate wines are paired better with foods that are prepared in a more delicate manner, such as poached or steamed. Meals that are roasted, grilled, and sautéed should be paired with wine that matches the dominant seasoning and flavor of the food with careful consideration to the type of sauce used as well. Wine is always a great complement to cheese, but be careful in your pairing selections. Generally, the most intensely flavored and pungent cheeses are paired best with sweeter wine. White wines match best with soft cheeses and stronger flavors. Red wines are generally best paired with hard, milder cheeses. When offering several cheese choices, white wines will fair better than reds because the softer, creamier cheeses will interfere more with reds and diminish the wine to a bland taste.
 
The following is a general guide that provides some examples of food and wine pairings to help get you started. Enjoy!
 
 
 
 
  Riesling Chardonnay Sauvignon Blanc
Meat/Fowl ham, chicken, turkey, smoked sausage, duck, pork, veal pork, grilled chicken, veal pork, veal, chicken, turkey
Seafood shrimp, crab, lobster, grilled fish, salmon, sea bass, smoked trout shellfish, rich fish dishes, oysters, grilled fish, salmon, shrimp, crab, lobster oysters, scallops, shrimp, crab, lobster, shellfish, grilled fish, salmon
Herbs/Spices rosemary, ginger tarragon, sesame, basil chives, tarragon, cilantro
Sauces lemon-based, spicy, chutney cream sauces, pesto citrus, light sauces
Vegetable/Fruit apricots, chili peppers, pears potato, apple, squash, mango citrus, green apple, asparagus
Cheese havarti, colby, gouda, edam, monterey jack, mild and strong cheeses bel paese, brick, bucheron, mild cheddar, cotija, goat cheese, humbolt, panela, parmesan, provolone blue castello, bucheron, sharp cheddar, derby, graddost, gruyere, neufchatel, pave affinois, sonoma jack, teleme
Dessert apple pie, carmel sauce banana bread, vanilla pudding sorbet, key lime pie
 
 
 
  Zinfandel Pinot Noir Cabernet Sauvignon
Meat/Fowl turkey, roast beef, sausage, beef, chicken, game birds, pork, veal, lamb turkey, roast beef, sausage, pork, veal, duck, lamb duck, goose, roast chicken, roast beef, roast lamb, steak, venison
Seafood cioppino, blackened fish salmon, grilled fish, tuna grilled tuna
Herbs/Spices pepper, nutmeg nutmeg, cinnamon, clove rosemary, juniper, lavender
Sauces spicy, cajun, salsa mushroom, light-medium red sauce brown sauce, tomato sauce, butter, cream
Vegetable/Fruit cranberries, grilled peppers, eggplant mushrooms, dried fruit, figs, strawberries black cherries, broccoli, tomatoes
Cheese brie, aged cheese goat cheese, brie, edam, strong cheeses camembert, Danish blue, cheddar gorgonzola
Dessert gingerbread, carrot cake crème brulee, white chocolate chocolate, gelato
 
 
 
  Merlot Syrah/Shiraz
Meat/Fowl grilled meats, barbeques, chicken, lamb, beef, pork, veal, steak duck, goose, game birds, roast lamb, sausage, barbeques, peppered red meats, beef
Seafood grilled swordfish, tuna salmon
Herbs/Spices mint, rosemary, juniper oregano, sage
Sauces bolognese, bearnaise heavy red sauce, barbeque sauce
Vegetable/Fruit carmelized onions, tomatoes, plums currants, stewed tomatoes, beets
Cheese parmesan, romano, brie sharp cheddar, roquefort
Dessert Dark chocolates rubarb pie, black forest cake
 
 
Home   About Us Contact Us Bar Search Cocktail Corner Toasts & Quotes Wine World Scotch Heaven Beer Garden Cigar Club
  Privacy Policy Terms of Use Site Map Events Bar Professionals Advertising
 
All Content © Copyright 2006-2010 BARZZ.Net. All Rights Reserved.